• Land Rover’s Invisible Bonnet Looks to be a Game Changer
    New technology from Land Rover features new grille cameras that project what they view onto the the vehicle’s windshield making it appear that the vehicle’s hood (or bonnet) is in fact transparent. The video included after the break demonstrates exactly what this looks like. […]
  • Land Rover Discovery Vision Concept to Debut at New York Auto Show
    We recently posted an article on the Land Rover Discovery Sport, a new vehicle projected to fit into Land Rover’s new Discovery family of vehicles. Now there is news of a second car that will bare the Discovery name - the Land Rover Discovery Vision, and the concept vehicle is set to make its debut at this month’s New York Auto Show. […]
  • Custom Land Rover Defender Rethinks an Old Classic
    This custom ICON D90 LS3 re-imagines what it means to be a Defender. Using a 1995 Land Rover Defender D90, the automotive wizards at Icon have recreated the iconic Land Rover using upgraded components including a V8 LS3 aluminum short block engine to develop a vehicle more aptly suited for the needs of today’s urban driver. […]

Tips on Breaking

Think of hitting the brakes on dry pavement.

When you brake, the front springs compress and the rear end raises.
Now think of the consequences if you are going down hill or over a large obstacle.
This bit of physics will increase the angle of descent and could cause your vehicle to tip over.

Cadence Braking sounds difficult, but its not.

As you feel a wheel start to spin, gently and purposely pump the brake pedal, WITH YOUR LEFT FOOT.
Keep your right foot on the gas pedal. This takes a lot of practice.
This slows the spinning wheel thus confusing the open differential into spreading power back to both wheels.
Gently and systematically pump the beak pedal to the point where the break just engages.
Use your left foot, keep your right foot over the accelerator in case a wheel locks up.
If this happens take your foot off the break pedal and plant it firmly on the floor.
Then gently ‘blip’ the throttle to bring the speed of the wheels up to the speed of the vehicles momentum