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  • Land Rover to Launch Hardcore SVX Off Roaders
    Land Rover Special Vehicle Operations Division (SVO) is planning a line of specialized, hardcore off-roaders to complement their SVR performance series and SVAutobiaography luxury/bespoke versions. The new lineup will be called SVX, a designation that Land Rover has used before for some "spiced up" Defender models.
  • JLR Developing Eye Tracking Wiper System
    As part of Land Rover’s partnership with Intel that was announced this past January, it continues to develop its Driver Monitor System. The system is designed around the concept that the vehicle can adjust speed and braking characteristics based on whether or not it thinks the driver is focused on events occurring in the field […]
  • Defender Production Moving To India?
    Yet more news about the future of Defender production - Land Rover will cease manufacturing of Defenders in the UK, after a nearly 70-year continuous run starting in 1948. The classic-looking Defenders, modernized as they are, simply won’t meet new EU vehicle emissions regulations.

Tips on Breaking

Think of hitting the brakes on dry pavement.

When you brake, the front springs compress and the rear end raises.
Now think of the consequences if you are going down hill or over a large obstacle.
This bit of physics will increase the angle of descent and could cause your vehicle to tip over.

Cadence Braking sounds difficult, but its not.

As you feel a wheel start to spin, gently and purposely pump the brake pedal, WITH YOUR LEFT FOOT.
Keep your right foot on the gas pedal. This takes a lot of practice.
This slows the spinning wheel thus confusing the open differential into spreading power back to both wheels.
Gently and systematically pump the beak pedal to the point where the break just engages.
Use your left foot, keep your right foot over the accelerator in case a wheel locks up.
If this happens take your foot off the break pedal and plant it firmly on the floor.
Then gently ‘blip’ the throttle to bring the speed of the wheels up to the speed of the vehicles momentum